CIDL Adults
Monday
10:00 am - 9:00 pm
Curbside only until 8:45PM
Tuesday
10:00 am - 9:00 pm
Curbside only until 8:45PM
Wednesday
10:00 am - 9:00 pm
Curbside only until 8:45PM
Thursday
10:00 am - 9:00 pm
Curbside only until 8:45PM
Friday
10:00 : 18:00
Curbside only until 5:45PM
Saturday
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Curbside only until :45PM
Sunday
1:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Curbside only until 5:45PM

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CIDL Head of Adult Services

Evan Smale

Email: smalee@cidlibrary.org 

Phone: (248)625-2212

Reader's Advisory

Like Westerns? Fancy some Fantasy? Never leave the house without a Mystery novel.  Check out a list of recommended books by genre, curated by our librarians.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beth's Blog

One of our adult librarians, Beth, has created a blog where you can find recipes, craft inspiration, and everything in between to keep busy and have fun at home! Click the button below to get started now!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tell Us About Your Travels

Tell Us About Your Travels is going online! Click the button below to check out our latest program on YouTube!

 

 

 

 

Book Groups and Book Kits

*** All book groups are temporarily meeting virtually ***

 

CIDL currently offers four book groups for adults, ranging from onsite, offsite, and virtual!

 We also offer book kits available for checkout!

 

 

Click the button below to see all the book groups available at CIDL!

Staff Recommendation: Murder in G Major

If you’re looking for a new cozy-mystery series to start, I have a great suggestion for you, the Gethsemane Brown mysteries by Alexia Gordon.  I just listened to the first book in the series, Murder in G Major, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.



Gethsemane is a world class, professional classical musician from Dallas, Texas.  She moves to Ireland to take the job of assistant orchestra director of the Cork Philharmonic, but when the promised job is given to the musical director’s mistress, Gethsemane is left scrambling to find a new position.  She does not want to go back to the USA without job, because in a family of overachievers, she feels she would be letting them down. 



Gethsemane accepts a music teacher position at St. Brennan’s School for Boys in Dunmullach, a fictional town high on the cliffs in southwestern Ireland.  She has six weeks to steer the students to victory in the Annual All-County School Orchestra Competition.  If she can pull off this win, she can save face and return home to America. 



Gethsemane settles into the quaint, thatched Carraigfaire Cottage.  But, she’s not alone.  She quickly discovers that the ghost of Eamon McCarthy, the genius composer who is accused of killing his wife, Orla, and then committing suicide, inhabits the house.  His spirit can’t pass over because he neither killed his wife or committed suicide 25 years ago, and he beseeches Gethsemane to help him find their killer.



Gethsemane’s reluctant investigation provokes a dormant killer, and she soon finds herself in grave danger.  Dunmullach is a small town filled with many quirky characters, any number of them who are potential suspects.  Gethsemane often enlists the help of Francis Grennan, a math teacher at St. Brennan’s, to help her in her sleuthing.  As Gethsemane races to prevent a deadly encore, will she uncover the truth or star in her own farewell performance?"



I really like the character of Gethsemane Brown.  She’s independent and smart and a fresh, unique amateur sleuth.  In the words of Lou Grant, she’s “got a lotta of spunk.”  (That’s a reference from The Mary Tyler Moore Show for you youngsters wondering who Lou Grant is. ?) She’s worked hard her whole life to get where she’s at professionally, and she uses this same drive to track down the clues that point a finger at the murderer of Eamon and Orla.



The relationship between Gethsemane and Eamon is genuine and comical.  She can smell him before she sees him because of his signature cologne, Gaeltacht – leather, cedar, pepper, and hay.  They share their life stories with each other, which endears him to Gethsemane, and makes her willing to help him in his quest.  When things get dicey for Gethsemane as she gets closer to the killer’s identity, Eamon fears for her safety and tries to dissuade her from working on her own and to turn to the police to reopen this long ignored cold case.



Although we do find out the McCarthy’s killer near the end, there is an exciting cliff-hanger that nicely sets up the next book in the series.  Gethsemane and Eamon are an interesting pair that you want to read more about, and Frances Grennan is definitely a potential love-interest for our musician/teacher/detective heroine.  Something tells me Gethsemane won’t be heading back to America anytime soon. 






Check out the full review here!

Beth Grai, Adult Services Librarian
Click here for past recommendations!

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